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Why Your Cabin Needs an Energy Audit

How can you scour the cabin for energy leaks without giving up valuable patio time? It’s simple – consult an energy auditor.



Chances are, you’d rather spend your weekends at the cabin kicking back on the patio with a cold beverage and mindfully soaking up the sunshine than contemplating how much the place’s energy bill cost last month. But cutting back on energy costs means you’ll have more money for fun stuff at the cabin, like the new badminton set you’ve been eyeing since last summer.

So how can you scour the cabin for energy leaks without giving up valuable patio time? It’s simple – consult an energy auditor. These professionals are certified to examine residences and assess how energy efficient they are. During a typical assessment, the energy auditor will look at the cabin’s exterior for leaks, check out the insulation (or lack thereof), look for gaps around holes for electrical wiring and fixtures, evaluate the furnace and ductwork, and perform a blower door test and a thermographic scan.

See also DIY Energy-Saving Ideas for the Cabin

The blower door test lowers the pressure inside the cabin so the higher pressure outside air flows inside. The auditor can then detect air leaks to determine how airtight the cabin is. This test can also help you figure out the source of any moisture condensation problems. For the thermographic scan, the energy auditor uses an infrared camera to see hot and cold spots inside the cabin.

After your cabin gets its checkup, the energy auditor issues a report with specific recommendations to upgrade your cabin for maximum energy efficiency. It’s a great way to make sure your money is well spent on effective renovations.

To find an auditor in your area, look under “Energy” in the telephone directory. It’s also a good idea to ask your state’s energy office. Not only can they help you find an energy auditor, they’ll also be able to tell you about any incentive programs for homeowners who get energy audits. To find your state energy office, visit naseo.org/members-states.

SOURCES: energy.gov, energysavers.gov